Republican senator has 'very serious' concerns on United States health-care bill

Ebony Scott
June 26, 2017

In unusually harsh terms, a conservative Republican senator accused party leaders Monday of trying to rush the party's health care bill through the Senate in remarks that underscored the challenge they face in staunching a rebellion among GOP lawmakers.

McConnell has said he's willing to make changes to win support, and in the week ahead, plenty of backroom bargaining is expected.

Speaking to "Fox & Friends", Trump claimed that former President Barack Obama only called the draft bill "mean" because he did it first.

"I have very serious concerns about the bill", Collins said in an interview with ABC's This Week.

Fox News' Pete Hegseth pointed to former President Barack Obama's recent Facebook post criticizing the Senate's healthcare bill.

US Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, of NY, said Democrats would be working hard to defeat the bill, having already made clear they would co-operate with Republicans if they agreed to drop a repeal of the Affordable Care Act and instead work to improve it.

The Senate is days away from voting on a Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, but leadership has, for the time being, fallen short so far of securing the 50 votes necessary to pass the measure. "Based on what I've seen, given the inflation rate that would be applied in the outer years to the Medicaid program, the Senate bill is going to have more impact on the Medicaid program than even the House bill", Sen.

Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has pushed for a vote before the July 4th Independence Day holiday recess that begins at the end of this week. But she said it will be "extremely difficult" for the White House to be able to find a narrow path to attract both conservatives and moderates. The office's report on the House's health care bill, which is similar in many respects to the Senate measure, said if it became law, 51 million people would be uninsured by the year 2026 - meaning 23 million fewer people would have insurance coverage than if Obamacare remains the law of the land. He said he feels "a sense of urgency" to push forward because the health care system is in "full meltdown mode". Trump has yet to explicitly say whether he will support the legislation as it is now written.

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Cornyn made the comments Sunday at a private gathering hosted by the libertarian Koch brothers in Colorado.

The Atlantic explained that the Senate bill "created a backdoor way" to allow insurers "to discriminate against a pre-existing condition" by allowing states to "easily waive the requirement to cover Essential Health Benefits", which exists under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Trump said he thought Republicans in the US Senate were doing enough to push through the bill and criticised Democrats for their opposition.

The Senate would phase out Obamacare's expansion of the Medicaid program for the poor more gradually than the House bill, waiting until after the 2020 presidential election, but would enact deeper cuts starting in 2025.

And he continued about an hour later, saying: "Republican Senators are working very hard to get there, with no help from the Democrats".

Some Democrats say they're ready to negotiate.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of NY said Democrats have been clear they will cooperate with Republicans if they agree to drop a repeal of the Affordable Care Act and instead work to improve it.

"It would be so great if the Democrats and Republicans could get together, wrap their arms around it and come up with something that everybody's happy with", the USA president said.

Other reports by GizPress

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