First dog Nemo cocks a leg in Élysée Palace meeting

Pauline Gross
October 24, 2017

Media favorite Nemo, the dog of French President Emmanuel Macron, has been caught in a steaming hot controversy after derailing a filmed meeting with top officials by urinating on a gilded fireplace at the Elysee Palace.

And this one was no different, with the French President left red faced on national TV.

Macron and his team could not help but laugh after spotting the dog doing the act.

Macron said Nemo had done something "quite exceptional" after the mutt's dodgy bladder sent the meeting into hysterics, reports Sun UK. "I wondered what that noise was", the junior minister for ecology, Brune Poirson, says.

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While, another junior minister, Julien Denormandie asked - "Does that happen often?"

Macron was trying to combat flagging personal ratings and an image as a high-handed technocrat when he spent several hours selecting the dog with his wife Brigitte.

Macron jokes: 'You've made my dog behave in a very unusual manner'.

Despite being the first presidential pet to come from such "humble" beginings, Nemo seems to have picked up on the protocol and is following in the footsteps of his predecessors when it comes to causing trouble at the Élysée. Nicolas Sarkozy's dogs caused so much damage gnawing the edges of historic furniture that thousands of euros of restoration work was needed after Sarkozy's departure, according to the investigative website Mediapart.

Other reports by GizPress

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