Senegal, Japan fans sweep stadium after victory, win hearts

Doug Mendoza
June 22, 2018

Senegal kick-started their Group H campaign with an impressive 2-0 win over Poland, 16 years after first appearing in the World Cup in 2002.

Videos and photos began surfacing on social media showing fans clearing rubbish from the stadium aisles and under seats.

In the World Cup, Japan became the first Asian team to win against a South American opponent by beating Colombia 2 to 1.

For starters, the Japanese fans have made headlines for continuing their practice of respectfully picking up trash and cleaning up stadiums after their games.

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Japan-based soccer writer Scott McIntyre told the BBC that cleaning up after yourself following a sporting event was "not just part of the football but part of Japanese culture".

However, as more than 25,000 Colombian disappointed fans left the Mordovia Arena in Saransk, one Twitter user posted a picture of Sanchez aligned with a photograph of Escobar and the message: "I propose a dream". Both are campaigning at the ongoing world cup in Russian Federation and both have won their opening matches.

It was a case of squeaky bum time when fans finally tore themselves away from the television earlier this week after a nail-biting first 45 minutes, with water use jumping 24 per cent in Tokyo during the break, the city's waterworks bureau said today. It is a habit drilled into citizens from a young age, with students expected to clean their school classrooms and hallways. Thus far, the World Cup has been hard to predict, with some of the best teams falling to underdogs and confounding the experts.

Not bad, Senegal and Japan.

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